Grace and Truth: The Tension

    

The other day I heard a sermon by Robert Madu (Google him) on the topic that is this post’s title. I feel you flinching. Don’t worry. I will not preach at you (unless you want to talk privately). But I found it interesting because of the discussion on the dichotomy of grace and truth. Too much grace, and a message is watered down. Too much truth, and compassion goes out the window. Yet it is possible to live in the tension of both.

I’ve struggled to know what to post lately. With so many voices already lifted, what could I add? (By the way, for a great post on giving voice, I recommend Laura Bruno Lilly’s latest post. Click here for it.) And then I heard the above sermon which really hit home to me. So here I am.

Sometimes, it’s easy to forget that we’re all struggling, hurting, sad, afraid, and overwhelmed. That we all want to be heard. That we all were children once who grew up without all of the answers, no matter how much we pretend otherwise.

So, we criticize, complain, ignore, put down, demand—I feel exhausted just thinking about that list. And by we, I mean me. I’ve done all of the above in just the past week or so. “They see what they need to do. Why don’t they do it?” I grumbled. Truth without grace.

Or, I have thought, Let’s all just move on! Grace without truth.

Living in the tension of grace and truth is not easy. But we need that tension, don’t we . . . when we mess up. When we see someone else mess up. When we’re afraid. When we see someone else with a fear that’s different from ours and we are tempted to judge.

We need it from each other. We need each other.

Grace and Truth images found somewhere on the internet via Bing.

The Perfect Pillow

I read this picture book the other night (perfect bedtime reading)

and thought, What is the perfect pillow?

I must confess that this is not a question I’ve ever thought long and hard about. Back in the day, my parents shopped for sheets and pillow cases during the January white sales. They probably bought new pillows also. I say probably, because when I was a kid, I never paid too much attention to what my parents thought about pillows or bedding in general. I only knew that the pillow I was used to was the perfect pillow. In fact, I took to college the same pillow I’d slept on for ages!

These days, I’ve never met a $3.99 pillow I didn’t like. Some people might be appalled at the cheapness, especially when pillows sell for ten, twenty, even a hundred times that amount.

Or tens of thousands times that amount.

Out of curiosity, I Googled to discover the most expensive pillow, thinking that pillow had to be the most perfect pillow ever. This article stated that the world’s most expensive pillow (photo below) was developed by a Dutch inventor/physical therapist named Thijs van der Hilst. It is called the Tailormade Gold Edition Pillow. It is made of memory foam based on a 3-D scan and has a 24-carat gold cover, diamonds, and a 22.5-karat sapphire. It is only $57,000.

The Tailormade pillow. I think the appropriate thing to say right now is, “Ta da!”

Ha! A mere pittance! The company that makes this pillow sells one for $3995. I’m sure you’ll want to order several, so click here to get yours now!

Seriously, the perfect pillow is one that helps you gain restful sleep. If you’re a back sleeper, a stomach sleeper, or a side sleeper, the perfect pillow varies, especially if you’re dealing with back or neck pain also. Searching the internet for these categories can net you dozens of duck feather/down, memory foam, and latex pillow recommendations.

But these days, the perfect pillow, at least for me, is one made by a friend: the fabulous Laura Bruno Lilly who made and sent this one:

What kind of pillow is perfect for you?

Pillow found at trendhunters.com. Other photos by L. Marie.

“A Crack in Everything”—In Partial Fulfillment of the 3 Quotes 3 Days Thingie

Laura Bruno Lilly nominated me for the 3 Quotes 3 Days Blogger Tag Thingie (not its official title). Thank you, Laura! 😃 But I decided to break the rules and post a quote one day instead of three, and nominate anyone who wants to do it (or not do it). Laura’s post with the rules can be found here, for those of you who are rule followers. (Blessings be upon your heads.)

On with the quote:

Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering
There is a crack in everything
That’s how the light gets in. Leonard Cohen from “Anthem”

If you’re scratching your head, wondering what Cohen meant by those words, there’s no better explanation than the one he offers. You can find that here.

I chose it because I totally get the “crack in everything.” I remember as a kid, bemoaning what I thought was my lack of a perfect smile because of a gap between my front teeth. And as a teen, I worried about having “chicken legs” (a description given to them by a guy I once liked romantically, but later didn’t) instead of the perfectly sculpted ones others seemed to have. And then as an adult, I could not seem to produce the “perfect offering” novel-wise that would be rejection proof. 😀

Sometimes life reminds you that the hope of reaching perfection, or sorrowing over the lack of that state, is a waste of time. Granted, I’m not advocating, “So don’t try at all.” Instead, I think Leonard said it best:

Ring the bells that still can ring
Forget your perfect offering

On a less-than-perfect cloudy day, these daffodils gracefully bending in the wind were a lovely reminder of the beauty to be had even in imperfection.

Babette is babysitting. Not sure who would trust her to do that.

Liberty Bell photo from en.wikipedia.org. Leonard Cohen photo from fanpop.com. Other photos by L. Marie.