Perfume? Cologne? What’s the Difference?

Wondering about that spicy scent you smell? That’s because I just sprayed this:

Looking at this bottle of Exclamation, would you think it was a cologne or perfume (if you didn’t already know)? Maybe you’re thinking, Who cares? or What’s the difference?

So glad you asked the latter.

As you know, synthetic and natural oils and ethanol are what give perfumes and colognes their scent. Perfumes contain a higher amount of oils—about 20 to 30 percent (though some internet articles cited 15 to 30). Colognes (for men and women), however have 2 to 4 percent. And in case you’re wondering, an eau de toilette (a more potent cologne) has 5 to 15 percent while an eau de parfum (a lighter perfume) has 15 to 20 percent.

An eau de toilette spray

Another difference is how long the scent lingers and how far it spreads in the air. Consider the last fragrance you smelled. How potent was it? Very potent, if you could smell it in another room. The smell of perfume can last at least six to eight hours. Some scents last 24 hours. As for distance, I can’t help recalling a small bottle of perfume someone gave me years ago. I used just a tiny bit of it. But the scent filled my apartment, with hints of it lingering three days. Three. Days.

The scent of cologne, however, lasts a couple of hours.

Now, let’s talk about the price of perfumes. Ingredients like rare flowers drive up the price. Marketing and packaging also are factors in pricing. Fragrances like Coco Mademoiselle by Chanel and Mémoire d’une Odeur by Gucci cost well over a hundred dollars—maybe more, depending on where you buy them.

  

But some perfumes are extremely expensive. Chanel No. 5, one of the most well-known fragrances in the world, has a limited edition version costing $30,000/30.4 oz. We all have that on our nightstand or bathroom shelf don’t we?

Thirty grand is pocket change compared to the cost of Shumukh, which is the world’s most expensive perfume at $1.3 million. Its crystal bottle comes in a case adorned in diamonds (38.55 carats), pearls, and gold. Of course it would.

According to CNN.com:

The his/hers perfume apparently contains hints of sandalwood, musk, Ylang-ylang, Turkish rose, Indian agarwood, musk and patchouli.

Be sure to add that to your Christmas list. It’s on mine.

By the way, Exclamation (pictured above) is a cologne, in case you wondered. You won’t find even one diamond on its bottle. Hours after I began writing this post, ts scent has already dissipated.

Do you have a favorite cologne or perfume? What kind(s) of scent(s) is/are your favorites?

Kitty believes she can pass this off as a fine fragrance—Eau de Gandalf. Surely it is worth a million dollars, she thinks, though I was quick to tell her that no one would believe this Pez dispenser is fine perfume.

Chanel image from allure.com. Shumukh image from gulfnews.com. Coco Mademoiselle found at chanel.com. Mémoire d’une Odeur image found at sabinastore.com. Marc Jacobs Daisy Eau de Toilette Spray found at bloomingdales.com. Other photos by L. Marie.