Still Beckoning the Lovely

My continuing quest to beckon the lovely took me to the gym of a church this past Saturday, where I helped organize the games for a five-year-old’s birthday party. (If you have no idea what beckoning the lovely means, click here for the post that provides more information.) Picture twenty-one shrieking kids eight years old and under (most around four years old or five years old), racing at top speed across a gym—sometimes colliding with each other—and you’ll know what my day was like.

    

   

Sorry. I’m just showing photos of decorations. No one gave me permission to show his or her kids on this blog.

I know what you’re thinking. You and I are close like that. You’re thinking, How is being in a room with twenty-one children lovely?

Well, I’ve mentioned on this blog before that I can’t have biological children. But I appreciate the miracle that is a child.

That doesn’t mean I have a Pollyanna view of children. I know kids can be cruel to each other. After all, I was not a nice child. I remember how a friend of mine and I made up a mean song about a girl named Jennifer, whom we didn’t like for some reason. We sang it with gusto in her presence. See? Not a nice kid.

Plus, I’ve been around kids all of my life in some capacity or another. I’m related to some, I’ve taught others, babysat them, scolded them, and planned parties for them. Their sense of wonder and their skill at getting on your last nerve are what inspire me to write books for and about them.

So, helping out at that party, as tiring as it was, is what I would describe as lovely. Seeing how much fun the kids had, as well as the dads who courageously allowed groups of small children not necessarily their own to dress them as jellyfish, reminds me of the creative ways adults can be present in the lives of children.

Speaking of present, that’s my cue to segue to the winner of Second Chance Romance, a novel written by your friend and mine, Jill Weatherholt. Jill is giving away a signed copy as a present to a commenter. (See what I did there with present? . . . Okay, I’ll stop.)

  

The winner is . . .

Is

Is

Is

Laura Bruno Lilly!

Laura, please comment below to confirm. I will then pass along your email address to Jill. Thank you to all who commented!

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45 thoughts on “Still Beckoning the Lovely

  1. A child’s party is both entertaining and scary. Been there many times with the ‘collisions’. My son seemed to be involved in a lot of those for a year. Love the shark fin in the table.

  2. L. – You may have been unkind to one child, but that does not make you a “not nice kid.” As Whitman says: we contain multitudes. YOU beckon the lovely simply by being you in the world. Thank you for all that you do to raise up the ordinary and help us see the lovely in it. (For the record, I, too, was mean to a girl at school. I, too, have evolved. and I, too, love children’s birthday parties – exhaustion and all). 😉

  3. I love being around kids ~> their exuberance and excitement is contagious and HAPPY! That said, “kid fixes” are best in small doses! 😀

    I see your jellyfish got to attend the party too!

  4. Like I told Jill already: Yippeee! What a fun surprise! Especially since I’m back home in CO doing some business and thus haven’t been doing much in the way of blog-reading, etc.

    To think, my very own copy of her book will most likely be awaiting my eyes upon our return to SC.
    🙂
    Thanks to both of you guys for this!

  5. And….kudos to:
    “…the dads who courageously allowed groups of small children not necessarily their own to dress them as jellyfish, reminds me of the creative ways adults can be present in the lives of children.”
    That’s what it’s all about!

  6. Congratulations, Laura. 🙂
    It looks like a fun party, though I can only imagine the organized chaos.
    Love the fin, which I see you found at Pinterest, and can imagine the running, colliding, sweaty, laughing, crying children. While I was never the bullying type, I was always the bossy one. My sister and cousin, who is exactly my age, were just reminiscing the other day about how I always wanted to play school. They would play for a short while, then announce RECESS! Out they ran, leaving me stuck with a stick of chalk. 🙂

  7. …twenty-one shrieking kids eight years old and under (most around four years old or five years old), racing at top speed across a gym—sometimes colliding with each other— is a recipe for a headache, which is why I salute you. 🙂

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