Check This Out: The Lost Celt

Happy Memorial Day! I’m back on the blog finally! And I’m not alone—I’m with the awesome A. E. (Amanda) Conran, author of the middle grade novel, The Lost Celt, which was published by Gosling Press/Goosebottom Books this past March. This book is very appropriate for a holiday like this. I’ll tell you about the giveaway for it at the end of the interview.

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El Space: Four quick facts about yourself?
Amanda: I’m originally from Leicestershire, England. It’s a county suddenly in the news, as you’ll know if you’re a historian or a soccer fan. (Richard III and Leicester City!)

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I moved to the Bay Area when my first child was six-weeks old. My husband had been offered a job at Industrial Light and Magic working on the new Star Wars films. It was his childhood ambition to work for Lucas. We only came for two years, but that’s what everyone says when they move here.

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I have a scar on my nose from being hit by a field hockey ball. I needed 12 stitches.

I’ve done a catch on the flying trapeze.

El Space: Wow! How did you come to write a middle grade novel about two boys—Mikey and Kyler—who think they have found a Celtic warrior in the twenty-first century?
Amanda: The Lost Celt is about how people return from war, how their return affects their families, and how we deal with this in society as a whole. It was inspired by a conversation with two emergency room doctors at a local VA Medical Center. They told me there were always more admissions in the ER on “certain nights,” when war stories or natural disasters were in the news. One friend remembered a man with red hair and beard, acting very much as I describe my Celt. My friend, who was truly worried for his patient, could not help but think he was witnessing a warrior, a Viking, in the ER. That idea, of the continuity of the potential effects of war through history, stayed with me.

There are many other factors at play in the inspiration for this story. I was fascinated by ancient history as a child. I painted tiny Roman and Celtic soldiers and visited historic sites across the UK, including walking Hadrian’s Wall. I read a lot of historical fiction, especially the works of Rosemary Sutcliff and Henry Treece, as well as Greek classics like Homer. Most of these were stories about living through, and returning from, war.

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Add to this the fact that I grew up in a small English village where there were still veterans of the First World War and the Second World War. We even had a German ex-POW still living in our village working on the farms just as he’d done when he was a prisoner. Their stories surrounded us. One great uncle survived the trenches in the First World War only to die as he returned home. He was so eager to see his family that he jumped out of the train before it stopped at the station. He was trapped between the train and the platform and died two weeks later of his injuries. My Grandma’s favorite uncle joined up for the First World War at age sixteen. He was recommended for a medal for commandeering a tank, but refused to accept it. He said he acted only out of anger, not bravery, because his friends had been killed around him.

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It’s strange, but the fact that my generation was brought up by people intimate with the effects of war did not fully strike me, however, until I came to live in America. One particular incident really hit home. My mum was visiting and we went for a meal with a group of friends my age. When we left the restaurant, my mother burst into tears. “They ordered so much food,” she said, “and they didn’t even eat it. There was more food on that table than we had for our entire family for a week during the war . . . and they didn’t even eat it.”

There was definitely a disconnect between my mother’s experience, my own upbringing, and that of my friends. I think it was this that led me to make one of my main characters a veteran of a recent war. I hadn’t planned to, but as I listened to the news, I became aware how deeply the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan were affecting a relatively small portion of our society. Unlike the experience of previous world wars in Europe, it struck me how large a gap there was between those who were serving and their families and those of us who were not. That did not feel right. I wanted to write a book that addressed that gap a little. Stories were not being shared, as the stories of earlier wars were shared when I was a child, or even the stories that the ancients told. I sometimes wonder whether the ancients were more willing to tell it, and accept it, how it is. Their understanding of a hero was more complex and maybe more helpful than ours today. As Grandpa says, they were all closer to war than we are.

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El Space: Mikey and Kyler play the type of videogame that a lot of my friends love to play—military strategy. Are you and/or your kids gamers? Did you have the game in mind when you first developed the book? Why or why not?
Amanda: Yes, my son really enjoys playing military strategy games, particularly Rome Total War. It was a subject of some debate/ambivalence in our household, which I reflected in Mikey’s mom’s attitudes in The Lost Celt.

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In earlier drafts Mikey played with toy soldiers. The video game only came into the story when my editor asked me to make Mikey absolutely sure he was seeing a real live Celt from the word go. Immersing Mikey in a video game world that pitched Romans against Celts was the obvious choice. I could move his focus directly from the screen to the world in front of him in the VA and make the connection very easily.

El Space: You deal with a subject I haven’t seen much in middle grade books—PTSD. Without giving spoilers, why is that important to you and/or for young readers to learn about?
Amanda: I was brought up by children of war whose parents experienced and fought in both the Second and First World Wars. I think we are only just acknowledging their experiences, how they dealt with them and how some trauma/issues may have been passed on. At the time, everyone was in the same boat and they just got on with it.

According to the VA, 7–8% of the general population will experience PTSD at some point in their life. Depending on the conflict, 11–30% of service members will experience PTSD at some point. It’s really important to recognize that most service members don’t return from war with PTSD, but it’s also important to recognize that your mental health is important and there’s nothing wrong with seeking help. I don’t want to think of children or adults dealing with the after effects of trauma on their own. I think that is the key: being in a community, not alone.

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El Space: If you could go back in time to witness any event in history, which would you choose?
Amanda: I’d like to see my village before and after the Roman invasion. There’s a Roman villa on the hill above my village and, although it’s hidden underground, artifacts come up to the surface after every ploughing. I’d love to know who lived there.

El Space: What kinds of stories delight you?
Amanda: The Owl Service by Alan Garner, Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick, or The Butterfly Lion by Michael Morpurgo epitomize the sort of story I adore: books that resonate with a sense of place and the strength of our connection with the past, both real and mythical/magical. All the books I read as a child were like that: When Marnie was There by Joan G. Robinson, Charlotte Sometimes by Penelope Farmer, Elidor and The Weirdstone of Brisingamen by Alan Garner and the historical fiction of Rosemary Sutcliffe, Henry Treece, and Roger Lancelyn Green.

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El Space: What are you working on next?
Amanda: I’m working on two projects. The first is a middle grade based in France in World War One. The second is a historical middle grade based in a town much like San Rafael in the 1870s.

Thanks, Amanda, for being my guest!

You can find Amanda at her website, Twitter, and Facebook.

The Lost Celt is available at these fine establishments:

Amazon
Barnes and Noble
Goosebottom Books
Indiebound

But two of you will get a copy of your very own. Just comment below to be entered in the drawing! Winners to be announced on June 6.

Book covers from Goodreads. Star Wars logo from hr.wikipedia.org. Rome Total War image from gamehackstudios.com. PTSD image from talesfromthelou.wordpress.com. Iraq/Afghanistan Memorial from old.mcallen.net. First World War Memorial from oxfordhistory.org.uk. Hadrian’s wall from medievalhistories.com. Leicester City Football Club logo from ebay.co.uk. Richard III from abc.net.au.

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34 thoughts on “Check This Out: The Lost Celt

  1. Well said . i experienced myself this after war trauma after the Algeria war where I participate as many young French people .did.
    very interesting interview
    In friendship
    Micjhel

  2. Loved the historical snippets-how tragic and ironic for the man to survive the war but die as a result of his enthusiasm on reaching home.

      • Slowly! I’m not disciplined enough to set aside a set time to work on it. Instead I do a chapter here and there. Kids are off school for a week now so things grind to a halt again. I’m about half way through the first draft.

      • That’s good, right? Halfway is progress! I’m about halfway through my revised manuscript. I don’t have the excuse of kids though. 🙂

      • Yes it’s good 🙂 It’s starting to take shape. Couple of unforeseen things have helped the story along. Best of luck with yours.

      • I’m not sure-I’m new to this so don’t know much about agents, etc. I have a short story out in an anthology by the same publisher, and it was their editor that had been suggesting a novel, so perhaps I will try there.

      • Well, having a publisher already is a huge plus. But if you wanted to see what other publishers would take your work, an agent is handy for that. But there is that matter of giving up 15% of your royalties. . . .

      • There is a part of me that wonders about the advantages of going with a British publisher, getting the book out there, etc, but I was pleased with Heading North and my dealings with Nordland regarding the anthology, etc. so may continue with them.

  3. Welcome back, Linda! I enjoyed the interview with Amanda and am eager to read this book! It’s an important topic and there isn’t much for middle graders even though many have parents and grandparents who experienced the trauma of war.

  4. First of all, welcome back, L. Marie.
    Secondly, thank you and Amanda for this insight into not only “The Lost Celt”, but, to the many aspects of PTSD as well. The book sounds engaging.
    I’m not surprised by the fact that PTSD episodes (sorry, not sure what to call them) have greater occurrences on certain holidays, but, it is enlightening to read it here. I can only begin to imagine the horrors of war. I have a prayer book of one of my mother’s cousins. He fought in WWI, came home, but, was institutionalized in the Elgin sanitarium, where he committed suicide. He must have suffered from what we now know as PTSD.

    • Thank you. Glad to be back.
      Oh my. How sad, Penny. It sounds like PTSD. There was so much that was unknown about this trauma back in the day. I watched some videos of soldiers struggling to describe their emotions. It is horribly difficult to get through PTSD!

      • My heart goes out to all who suffer from PTSD. I’m sure it is on several levels of intensity and know it sometimes doesn’t manifest itself for years. We are getting better as a society recognizing and making treatments available, but . . . Thank you, L. Marie.

  5. Good to see you back, L Marie, and a great, interesting interview! My parents were of the generation who all fought in WW2 and, as Amanda says, when everyone was involved there wasn’t much option but for them all just to come home and get on with it.

    • Thank you, FF!
      With WWII and the Korean War, there was more support. But with highly protested wars like Vietnam and the Middle East, soldiers find themselves in the middle, without as much emotional support. It’s so hard.

  6. Pingback: Check This Out: Charlotte Cuts It Out | El Space–The Blog of L. Marie

  7. Flying trapeze artist, that’s amazing! I was so happy to read this interview. My dear, late husband had severe PTSD from his combat experiences in the Viet Nam conflict. My uncles were in WWII, and they didn’t discuss it, but I know enough about their stories to see it now, in retrospect. It is indeed a family disease, communicable. I thank you for your courage and insight in writing this book for a younger audience. Right on.

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