Check This Out: Kinda Like Brothers

Over the past year, I’ve had the pleasure of talking with wonderful authors. That’s definitely the case today as I talk with the marvelous Coe Booth, who today will discuss her latest book, a wonderful middle grade novel (her first)—Kinda Like Brothers, published by Scholastic Press.

        coe_booth_-_author_photo KindaLikeBrothers

Coe is represented by Jodi Reamer at Writers House. Here is a synopsis of Kinda Like Brothers:

Jarrett doesn’t trust Kevon. But he’s got to share a room with him anyway.

It was one thing when Jarrett’s mom took care of foster babies who needed help. But this time it’s different. This time the baby who needs help has an older brother—a kid Jarrett’s age named Kevon.

Everyone thinks Jarrett and Kevon should be friends—but that’s not gonna happen. Not when Kevon’s acting like he’s better than Jarrett—and not when Jarrett finds out Kevon’s keeping some major secrets.

Jarrett doesn’t think it’s fair that he has to share his room, his friends, and his life with some stranger. He’s gotta do something about it—but what?

Cool, huh? Let’s talk to Coe!

El Space: Four quick facts about yourself?
Coe: (1) I’m seriously afraid of moths (and all kinds of creepy flying bugs!) (2) I’m a vegetarian, but I enjoy letting my characters eat meat. (3) I have a somewhat unhealthy addiction to fountain pens and pretty notebooks. I have more notebooks than I could possibly use in my lifetime! (4) I go on at least one week-long meditation retreat every year—a silent retreat where reading, writing, and even talking are not allowed.

Pen-765J-4

El Space: Awesome! You’re well known for young adult novels like (Tyrell, Kendra, Bronxwood). What inspired you to write a middle grade novel?

       421338 0-439-92536-3

8494485

Coe: When I was really young, I hated reading. I loved writing my own stories, but I didn’t like reading books because I couldn’t relate to any of them. That all changed in fourth grade when my teacher gave me a copy of one of Judy Blume’s novels and I discovered that books could actually be fun. Ever since then, I recognized the power that middle grade books can have, and I’ve always wanted to write for that age group. My hope is that I can write something that can grab kids who don’t like to read and possibly change the way they think about books, too.

1504297

El Space: Kids in blended families will relate to Jarrett and Kevon. How has your background prepared you to write their story?
Coe: Several years ago, I worked as a child protective caseworker, investigating child abuse cases. Sometimes I would have to remove kids from their homes and place them in foster care. Working with foster families is what sparked the idea for Kinda Like Brothers. I was always curious what being a foster family was like for the biological children in the home, the ones who had to adapt to kids coming and going from their lives over and over again. Jarrett is one of those kids. He’s used to the foster babies because his mom has been taking them in ever since he can remember. But when Mom takes in Kevon, who is a year older than Jarrett, this is a little more than he can handle!

El Space: What was the most challenging aspect of writing this book?
Coe: With all my books, I struggle the most with characterization and voice. This book was no exception. I spent so much time writing and writing, and then I got to the point where I felt like I knew who Jarrett was and what he sounded like. Unfortunately, everything I had written up to that point wasn’t really the story I wanted to tell, so I ended up deleting the whole thing and starting all over again. That was really, really hard. But in the end I’m glad I let go of what wasn’t working so I could make room for what was.

red-delete-square-button-md

El Space: What do you hope readers will take away after reading your book?
Coe: There are so many foster families, and so many kids living in foster care. I hope I’m giving readers a little insight into a world they may not have thought about. But more importantly, of course, I hope readers fall in love with Jarrett and Kevon, and enjoy the story of how these two boys become (kinda like) brothers!

El Space: You’re on the faculty at VCFA. Yay! You usually have to give advice to students. Lately many people have addressed the need for more diversity in books. What advice do you have for aspiring writers on this topic?
Coe: Diversity is one of those things that’s easier said than done. Achieving diversity in the world of children’s books is a complex matter. It is so challenging getting these books written, published, and placed into the hands of children, and attention needs to be placed on each of these stages. As writers, we don’t have to force diversity into our novels. All we can do is make sure our writing reflects the world in its entirety and diversity would be accomplished in a natural way.

flags

El Space: What’s some of the best advice you’ve received about writing?
Coe: You don’t have to know where you’re going to get started. Just sit down and write.

El Space: What are you working on now?
Coe: Right now, I’m working on another YA novel. I’m still in the thinking-on-paper stage, so I’m not really sure what it’s about yet, but it’s fun discovering what this novel wants to be.

Coe, thanks so much for stopping by! You’re welcome anytime! And thanks to everyone else who took time out to join us. I’m giving away a copy of Kinda Like Brothers. Anyone who comments will be entered in the drawing. Winner to be announced Wednesday, October 8.

Can’t wait for that? If you have to have Kinda Like Brothers right now, you can find it here:

Amazon
Barnes and Noble
Indiebound
Powell’s

Looking for Coe? Check out her website and Twitter.

Flags image from diversity.uno.edu. Judy Blume cover from Goodreads. Fountain pen from eBay.

Advertisements

29 thoughts on “Check This Out: Kinda Like Brothers

  1. This was a terrific interview ladies! I had to laugh at Coe’s comment about owning more notebooks than she could ever use…I’m the same! I have them stockpiled all over my house. When it comes to notebooks, journals and pens, I confess…I’m a hoarder. 🙂
    Your book sounds great, Coe!

  2. Excellent, excellent interview! I can’t wait to read this novel. I’m going to share this post with one of my students, who is currently struggling with the concept of revision.

  3. Hi, Coe! You know how much I loved your book. Enjoyed the interview too. And I have that notebook problem. I took a lot of architecture classes in college, so I have a preference for those notebooks with the graph paper/grids.

  4. Hi, Linda! Hi, Coe! What a terrific interview! I can’t wait to read Jarrett’s and Kevon’s story! Coe, I remember when you blogged about deleting and starting fresh. It’s so inspiring to hear that hard decision led to this book. Also, I heard you on NPR the other day – another great interview, and so fun to hear your voice on the radio!

  5. Great interview, Linda & Coe! Coe, I loved what you had to say about diversity coming in naturally if we reflect the world in its entirety. And also the story of how you had to delete and start over, to “let go of what wasn’t working so I could make room for what was.” This writing takes bravery, doesn’t it?

Your Turn to Talk

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s